Psychogeography

Oxford Psychogeography meeting.   Turl Street Kitchen, Oxford. 6th January 2014.

(following Georges Perec in An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Paris.)

Turl Street groupsFour abreast, sitting in the Turl Street Kitchen, and one at the head of the table.  What is it we each see?  We have our own view out of the wide window.  I spend awhile just looking.  What is it that catches my eye?  What aspect of the everyday am I noticing?

Hats   10.40am – 11.10am

-Grey cable-knit woolly hat

-Navy/Gold/White headscarf, knotted under chin

-Tweed flat cap

-Multicoloured knitted bobble hat, white bobble

-Black scarf printed with Zebras, knotted under chin

-Quilted black fabric flat cap

-Green tweed flat cap

-Dusky pink knitted hat with light blue edge

-Bright orange cable-knit woolly hat

-Black pull-on hat, thinsulate

-Light fawn tweed flat cap

-Navy knitted woolly hat

-Dark green checked flat cap

-Green and red checked flat cap

-Black Royal Mail baseball cap

-White/pink animal print hijab

-Grey felt Derby hat with red and white felt flowers on brim

-Navy knitted woolly hat

-White beret

-Light green baseball hat

-Pale mauve corduroy peaked cap

-Green fleece peaked cap

-Black beret

-Black woolly hat, two light grey stripes

-Purple woolly hat

-Grey, small check, flat cap

-Fair Isle knitted hat with earpieces and ties

-Pale red, turquoise and white triangle patterned knitted hat

Then I turn to the colour of trousers, but am quickly bored.  Black, black, blue denim, black, black, black, black, blue denim, blue denim, dark blue denim, tan cord, blue denim, white, blue denim.  I can’t stand it any longer.

Three teenage girls, enjoying each other’s company, skip and bump down the road.

Groups 11.15am – 12.05pm.

I will count the number in each group.  I write a 1,2,3 etc.  Some, like those three girls, are easy to recognise as a group.  Others are strung out.  I don’t realise they are together until one turns their head to speak to the person behind.  I see many families; several walk as unconnected individuals, alone, not even a turned head comment.

Link to Oxford Psychogeography